All in Justice

A Christian’s acquittal in Pakistan is fueling advocacy against “blasphemy”  

After the unprecedented acquittal of a Christian from blasphemy charges, Pakistan is bowing to pressure from hardline Islamist groups to ban her exit from the Muslim-majority country. Assassinations and threats against those wanting to amend the blasphemy law throughout Bibi’s high-profile case have become common and polarizing.

Will Bible-believing Christians be discriminated against in the SOGIE Bill?

In a rare and dramatic display of opposition to a “lifestyle-altering” legislation in recent history, hundreds of Filipino Bible-believing Christians trooped to the Senate recently and held a peaceful rally against the Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity or Expression (SOGIE), also referred to as the Anti-Discrimination Bill.

Religious Freedom: What the United States can learn from Canada’s mistakes

(COMMENTARY) Canada serves as a warning to the United States of the tricky balance that the legalization of same-sex marriage brings with it. The Supreme Court must protect the religious freedom of all American citizens. Should justices rule otherwise, the U.S. could be headed down the same downward spiral that Canada finds itself in today. 

A Modern Day Slave

With its postmodern skyline and first world reputation, Singapore seems to be the perfect place for many migrants to pursue fortune. But, in his wildest dreams, one man from Bangladesh could never have imagined that his dream job opportunity would lead him to become a “modern day slave”.

The Great Divide – Why The Church Isn’t Connecting With The #BlackLivesMatter Movement

Black Lives Matter is a departure from past social justice movements. It is not attached to any religious institution, and it is anonymous with no defined leadership. Unlike past civil rights movements spearheaded by ministers and laypeople, in the Black Lives Matter movement, the church has been relegated to the back seat.

Massacre trial could last years

MANILA – A Philippine senator who is a veteran human rights lawyer has expressed apprehension that the trial of the infamous Maguindanao massacre might take 200 years to finish because of the huge number of accused and witnessed involved. “The Department of Justice filed a case against 161 defendants with 300 witnesses. The trial will be very long,” Sen. Joker Arroyo told radio station DZRH here Sunday.