The Media Project is a network of mainstream journalists who are Christians pursuing accurate and intellectually honest reporting on all aspects of culture, particularly the role of religion in public life in all corners of the world. It welcomes friends from other faiths to such discussions and training.

Join the Media Project

Join the Media Project

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Thank you for your interest in joining our global network of working journalists committed to improving the quality and quantity of religion coverage in the news worldwide.  

TheMediaProject.org is the axis point for our network of member journalists and a platform for sharing our work, frank discussion, and enriching connections among our members.  

 

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Benefits of membership include:

*Access to our worldwide network of journalists.

*Become eligible to participate in conferences The Media Project sponsors around the world each year.

*Use of TheMediaProject.org as a means of promoting your work.

*Free blog to express your views and present your own material (video, photos, etc)

 

Criteria for membership in The Media Project are simple:

*Members must currently be earning at least half of their income through their work in the news media.   

*Some portion of our members' work is carried out in a “secular” (or non-religious) media organization.  

*Members self-identify as "Christian," though we have no doctrinal or credal requirement of any kind.

To become a member of The Media Project, we require that prospective members provide us with enough information to verify their identity, credentials and suitability for membership.  

Prior to approving new members, The Media Project will contact the individuals and/or institutions provided in the membership form.   

 

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Journalists share storytelling vision

Journalists share storytelling vision

'Sinister Muslim' stereotype fades

'Sinister Muslim' stereotype fades