All in News

A Christian’s acquittal in Pakistan is fueling advocacy against “blasphemy”  

After the unprecedented acquittal of a Christian from blasphemy charges, Pakistan is bowing to pressure from hardline Islamist groups to ban her exit from the Muslim-majority country. Assassinations and threats against those wanting to amend the blasphemy law throughout Bibi’s high-profile case have become common and polarizing.

Dr. Michael Guillen speaks on “The End of Life as We Know It” and the significance of faith in today’s world

Author and scientist Michael Guillen warns that scientists are working to resurrect extinct species, including the wooly mammoth, and says robots have made leaps and bounds in the past decade. He says Christians are more important than ever to take this opportunity to provide wisdom to a world so obsessed with scientific progress without considering the ramifications.

Christian Afghans Flee Taliban and Find Safety in India

The Afghan embassy estimates there are 30,000 Afghan refugees living in Delhi today. People seeking international protection are generally considered asylum-seekers until further determination may grant them refugee status. Many Afghans in Delhi are Hindu and Sikh whose families migrated from India before Afghanistan’s independence in 1919. Many of those Afghans fled to India for religious freedom and settled in a South Delhi colony that today has temples, mosques, gurudwaras and even an unmarked, underground church.

Justice Brett Kavanaugh and the Supreme Court’s Catholic majority

The U.S. Supreme Court isn’t only the highest court in the land, its judges have the responsibility to rule on cases that have a lasting impact on American politics, culture and religion. Driving those changes going forward will be a Catholic majority of justices who have become increasingly conservative, shifting the balance of the court for years to come.  

Pictures of Zionism

Sabelo Mlangeni is an award-winning photographer featured in galleries from the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts to San Francisco’s MOMA. He’s been awarded residencies from Germany to France. Featured once in The New Yorker, he was described as South Africa’s “Flâneur,” a term used to describe his ability to capture intimate moments wherever he travels. But while he is known around the world, his home is close to heart. His most recent gallery is Umlindelo Wamakhlowa (Night Vigil of the Believers) at Wits Art Museum (WAM), located at the University of Witswatersrand in Joburg. His series of photos in the exhibit document the Church of Zion and his own experience.

The role of online journalism and the Catholic Church sex-abuse scandal 

A whistleblower says the Vatican – and specifically Pope Francis –  was aware of immoral sexual abuse behavior years ago. When it was revealed that two Catholic journalists helped him to edit and distribute the letter making those claims, it shed a light on the increasingly polarized Catholic Church and the growth and influence of conservative news and opinion websites that oppose Pope Francis and what they believe is the pontiff’s assault on orthodoxy. 

Journalists feel the heat as Kenya ramps up fight against corruption, President Kenyatta seeks divine intervention

The Kenyan media is fighting back against politicians who are determined to restrict them from exposing corrupt deals. This comes after President Uhuru Kenyatta approached the church seeking divine intervention and comfort after he lost friends who were unhappy with his stance against theft of public land.

NXIVM: What you need to know

The bizarre, cultish group that made headlines for recruiting women to be “slaves” and “masters” has closed after its leader, Keith Raniere, was denied bail after appealing in court. Raniere’s cult, NXIVM, caught the public’s attention last fall when the New York Times published a detailed exposé that included graphic details about branding of female followers, coerced sexual acts and blackmail.

Wearing Religion On Her Sleeve

Historically, Indonesian Muslims have worn loosely wrapped, somewhat transparent, colorful scarves. Now, the most common covering is the jilbab, an opaque square scarf which is tightly wrapped and pinned under the chin, and typically does not show any hair. For Muslims who do not wear one, it is enough to “cover their hearts.” But for *Aya and many other Muslim women, the ritual of physically covering her body is also important, as it puts the religious principle into practice — an external expression of an internal disposition.