Anti-Christian Slaughter Escalates in Nigeria

Horrific reports have circulated via social media of late regarding bloodthirsty jihadi attacks on Nigerian Christians. So far in 2018, 6,000 innocent victims have been maimed or murdered. The news comes from devastated church leaders in Nigeria’s Plateau State, declaring that thousands of children, women, and the elderly have been brutalized — with many killed — in night raids by armed herdsmen.

Remember the Church Page? RNS story on churches aiding South Sudanese refugees will take you back

(COMMENTARY) The Republic of South Sudan is one of the world’s misery portals. Since its independence in 2011, it has known little else but war, poverty, hunger and political infighting among its power elites. South Sudan sought to secede from its northern neighbor, Sudan, in large part over religion. A newly brokered power-sharing agreement could change things for the better. However, those in the international media paying close attention to South Sudan note that we’ve been here before. 

Fires raging in American church: Catholics face hard choices after McCarrick scandal

Priests know what it's like to enter the pulpit facing scriptures that appear to have been torn from the headlines.That happened just the other day, with news that one of America's most powerful Catholics – retired Archbishop Theodore McCarrick of Washington, D.C. – had been accused of the sexual abuse of boys, as well as decades of seminarians. Days later the Sunday Mass lectionary featured the Prophet Jeremiah, speaking for Jehovah: "Woe to the shepherds who mislead and scatter the flock of my pasture."

God, man, faith, FIFA and the World Cup

(COMMENTARY) The International Football Association Board's "Laws of the Game" – used at the FIFA World Cup – state: "Equipment must not have any political, religious or personal slogans, statements or images." This rule "applies to all equipment (including clothing) worn by players," according to IFAB guidelines. BUT Does this apply to religious symbols woven into the flags and traditions of many nations?

Remembering the real Mister Rogers – as in the Rev. Fred Rogers

America was divided, tense and angry in 1969, when Fred Rogers faced a U.S. Senate Subcommittee poised to grant President Richard Nixon his requests for deep budget cuts for public broadcasting. Rogers told the senators why he kept telling children they were unique and special. But he also talked about fear, anger and confusion – because that's what children were feeling. The senators nixed the cuts, and the Rev. Fred Rogers – an ordained Presbyterian minister – continued with his complex blend of television, child development and subtle messages about faith.


Two prominent namers of names inside DC Beltway warrant in-depth religion profiles

(COMMENTARY) Justice Anthony Kennedy’s Supreme Court retirement throws the spotlight on one of the most influential players in Washington, D.C., when it comes to deciding what individuals inhabit the centers of power. Leonard Leo, executive vice president of the Federalist Society and the go-to guy for names of federal court appointees when Republicans rule the White House. Journalists should also be taking a close look at another Republican networker and talent-spotter, Kay Coles James, the president of the Heritage Foundation.